Environmental risk assessment

Groups: 
  • Design Projects
Category: 
  • Management

Basic

Requirements and Criteria Type: 
  • Contract Terms

Main Objective: 

The purpose of conducting an environmental risk assessment for construction work is to prevent incidents and limit negative impact on the external and local environment.

Requirement Specification: 

Environmental risk must be assessed for all aspects of the project. In the environmental risk assessment, the contractor must, as a minimum, assess and describe activities that have consequences on the following environmental impacts:

  • Contamination of water and soil
  • Air pollution including dust
  • Natural assets
  • Biodiversity
  • Greenhouse gas emissions from energy and material consumption
  • Waste management
  • Natural resources
  • Discharge to recipients

Personnel that hold relevant expertise in the coordination of requirements concerning the external environment, planning at an early phase or construction experience must conduct the environmental risk assessment through working groups that include representatives from relevant fields, as well as project management and representative(s) of the developer who are authorised to make decisions.

Prioritised risk-reducing measures must be incorporated into the contract for the execution.

The ALARP principle may be used as the basis for assessing risk-reducing measures. The ALARP principle implies a reverse burden of proof.

This means that identified measures are selected unless there is an unreasonable disparity between costs/disadvantages and benefit. Documentation of the disparity is normally required for major risks.

Documentation of the Requirement Specification: 

The contractor must document risk assessment meetings and interdisciplinary project planning to ensure that the necessary assessments are performed. Documentation from meetings must be followed up in the contractor’s plans for project planning.

Report – environmental risk assessment and prioritised risk-reducing measures with dated measures must be incorporated into the contract with the contractor.

Expertise must be documented by the requirement and the selected subjects being linked to the project’s environmental goals/ambitions and the other criteria that are selected.

This must be documented through a CV and specification showing the environmental coordinator’s duties and role in the project by the specified deadline. The environmental coordinator must have adequate expertise to manage the coordination of the work to follow up on the environmental goals and requirements for the project.

Information about the Requirement Specification: 

The Norwegian Government Agency for Financial Management recommends that personnel with relevant expertise in the coordination of requirements concerning the external environment be responsible for reviewing the environmental risk assessments in consultation with the project team. The person responsible for the working group must ensure that persons with adequate expertise are present during the review. If you have an external environment plan, this plan must be enclosed with the tender specification and it is also recommended that it be reviewed during the kick-off meeting.

Both the conditions and the risk situation may change throughout the different project phases. It could therefore be appropriate to update the environmental risk assessments before and during the implementation phase and to include a separate agenda item for the environment for all construction meetings.

This contractual condition can be used if you are unsure whether the market already has the requested expertise but may be able to obtain the expertise after the tenderer has been selected. If the market is immature in an area/subject, it may be appropriate to allow the contractor to obtain such expertise after the tender competition. If there is adequate expertise available in the market, this can be done in connection with award or qualification.

By default, the ALARP principle forms the basis for assessing risk-reducing measures in this requirement.  The ALARP principle implies a reverse burden of proof.

This means that identified measures are selected unless there is an unreasonable disparity between costs/disadvantages and benefit. Documentation of the disparity is normally required for major risks.

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Published: 25. Nov 2020, Last modified: 29. Dec 2020