Protection of biodiversity

Groups: 
  • Design-Build Contracts
Category: 
  • Ecology and Surface Water

Basic

Requirements and Criteria Type: 
  • Technical Specification (Requirement Specifications)

Main Objective: 

Motive

Today, physical development represents the greatest threat to our biodiversity. Two thirds of the animal and fish species that existed in the world in 1970 will be gone by 2020 and 70-80% of the green structure in our cities and urban areas has been built on since the 1950s.

Invasive species often displace local biodiversity and are therefore a great threat to Norwegian nature. Species that are deemed to constitute a high or very high ecological risk to Norwegian biodiversity are registered in the Alien Species List of Norway 2018. The species are therefore often described as alien species.

Argument

Physical developments can help to increase an area's biodiversity and ecological value with various measures.

Blue green structures are water and vegetation. The development of multifunctional blue green structures with open stormwater management is an important climate adaptation measure in cities and urban areas that also facilitates the development of indigenous nature.

Multifunctional blue green structures can also help to increase an area's attractiveness through good meeting places, greater mobility, temperature regulation, cleaner air, and better public health – as well as better living areas for people.

Stipulating a condition that a qualified ecologist must be employed to register, assess and possibly remove black listed species will prevent the unwanted proliferation of invasive species and thereby also safeguard valuable biodiversity.

Requirement Specification: 

Contractors must investigate whether black listed species exist in the area and this must be documented in a report that must, as a minimum, contain:

  • Mapped registration (SOSI) of the individual species
  • A table providing the names and brief descriptions of the species
  • Confirmation that the species have been registered on a species map
  • A plan showing which species it is relevant to combat and proposals for removing these
  • The species must be registered in: https://www.artsdatabanken.no/Pages/236414

The contractor's report must be completed in good time before the final outdoor plans are completed, i.e. xx.xx.xxxx, such that the developer has an opportunity to address the recommendations in the report.

Contractors must document the removal of alien species:

  • with photographs
  • A description of their transport and destruction, e.g. with receipts from an approved disposal site.

Information about the Requirement Specification: 

The requirement is especially relevant for black listed species in the case of physical developments close to valuable habitats and vulnerable nature, and less relevant in dense, urban districts. The inspection should therefore take place as close to the time of construction as possible. To ensure that as many species as possible are registered, at least two inspections must be carried out in the period May-September.

A search for valuable habitats in the local area in the Norwegian Environment Agency's map service Naturbase may show which species are indigenous to the site.

Ecological value is always relevant Previous developed sites in dense cities often have the greatest potential for increased ecological value, but it is also important to implement measures in more sparsely populated areas. Examples of measures are the establishment of new ecologically valuable habitats on roof spaces by using vegetation that is characteristic of the Oslo fjord region with its wealth of species. You can also create smaller areas with dead wood and open areas with sand and stone that will become suitable habitats for insects.

The table below shows a general list of measures that may be relevant in a physical development context:
MeasuresSuitable areasStatement
At least 50% of the site's area must have vegetationallIn most cases, green roofs, which are also important for local stormwater management, will help to ensure that the requirement can be fulfilled.
Indigenous species should generally be used. None of the species may be registered on the Alien Species List of Norway 2018 and the species must be ecologically risk assessed.all

Indigenous species support locally valuable habitat.

For example, some butterfly species are linked to a special plant.

Development of multilayered natureallIn nature, plants are often divided into four layers (bottom, field, bush and tree). Multilayered nature contributes to greater biodiversity.
Green roofsRoofs

Green roofs represent significant potential for the development of biodiversity and strengthening ecological contexts.

The preference is often for roofs with varying depth of growth medium, both with a view to the development of biodiversity and ecological contexts, and to accommodate the roof's tolerance (loads).

Apart from sedum, meadow and beach vegetation are regarded as suitable for green roofs.

Example of requirement: at least 30% of the roof must have indigenous meadow or beach vegetation.

Uncovering/restoring streams Uncovering/restoring streams represent a good opportunity for developing rich biodiversity.
Rain gardens, ditches Stormwater measures in the form of rain gardens and ditches enable the growth of indigenous wetland vegetation.
Open sections with sand and small stonesallOpen sections with sand and smaller stones provide habitats for sand-living insects, e.g. bees.
WoodallDead wood, preferably from hardwood, can create good habitats for insects.
Insect hotelallAn insect hotel can create a home for, among other things, solitary bees.
Nesting boxesRoofs, walls and treesSupports birdlife
Bat boxesRoofs, walls and treesCan help to safeguard threatened species

Advanced

Requirements and Criteria Type: 
  • Technical Specification (Requirement Specifications)

Main Objective: 

Motive

Today, physical development represents the greatest threat to our biodiversity. Two thirds of the animal and fish species that existed in the world in 1970 will be gone by 2020 and 70-80% of the green structure in our cities and urban areas has been built on since the 1950s.

Invasive species often displace local biodiversity and are therefore a great threat to Norwegian nature. Species that are deemed to constitute a high or very high ecological risk to Norwegian biodiversity are registered in the Alien Species List of Norway 2018. The species are therefore often described as alien species.

Argument

Physical developments can help to increase an area's biodiversity and ecological value with various measures.

Blue green structures are water and vegetation. The development of multifunctional blue green structures with open stormwater management is an important climate adaptation measure in cities and urban areas that also facilitates the development of indigenous nature.

Multifunctional blue green structures can also help to increase an area's attractiveness through good meeting places, greater mobility, temperature regulation, cleaner air, and better public health – as well as better living areas for people.

Stipulating a condition that a qualified ecologist must be employed to register, assess and possibly remove black listed species will prevent the unwanted proliferation of invasive species and thereby also safeguard valuable biodiversity.

Requirement Specification: 

Contractors must investigate whether alien species exist in the area and this must be documented in a report that must, as a minimum, contain:

  • Mapped registration (SOSI) of the individual species
  • A table providing the names and brief descriptions of the species
  • Confirmation that the species have been registered on a species map
  • A plan showing which species it is relevant to combat and proposals for removing these
  • The species must be registered in: https://www.artsdatabanken.no/Pages/236414

The contractor's report must be completed in good time before the final outdoor plans are completed, i.e. xx.xx.xxxx, such that the developer has an opportunity to address the recommendations in the report.

An ecologist must investigate which measures are relevant with respect to increasing a site's ecological value. 

The report must document that an inspection has been conducted before the construction works, including preparatory works, were carried out on the site and must, as a minimum, contain:

  • Description of the current situation
    • Orthophoto with area delineation
    • Mapped pictures from the inspection
    • Description of the inspection (time, date and weather conditions)
    • A description of the findings in the form of a table listing the registered species.
  • Documentation of the increased ecological value
    • A plant list and measures must be prepared in consultation with, and be approved by, an ecologist.
  • Follow-up
    • Suitable management plan for the landscape and habitats on the site for a minimum of the first 5 years after completion of the project
  • Relevant enclosures
    • Confirmation a qualified ecologist was used
    • Outdoor plan/landscape plan
    • Plant list

The ecologist's report must be completed in good time before the final outdoor plans are completed, i.e. xx.xx.xxxx, such that the developer has an opportunity to address the recommendations set out in the report.

This must be documented with the aid of a short account of the relevant experience that qualifies the ecologist:

At least 3 years' experience in ecology in the last 5 years. The experience must clearly demonstrate that the ecologist has a practical understanding of the factors that impact the environment in connection with physical development and the built environment. This involves providing advice and guidance on protecting and improving the environment and risk mitigation measures.

Contractors must implement measures in line with the recommendations in the ecological report.

Information about the Requirement Specification: 

The requirement is especially relevant for alien species in the case of physical developments close to valuable habitats and vulnerable nature, and less relevant in dense, urban districts. The inspection should therefore take place as close to the time of construction as possible. To ensure that as many species as possible are registered, at least two inspections must be carried out in the period May-September.

A search for valuable habitats in the local area in the Norwegian Environment Agency's map service Naturbase may show which species are indigenous to the site.

Ecological value is always relevant Previous developed sites in dense cities often have the greatest potential for increased ecological value, but it is also important to implement measures in more sparsely populated areas. Examples of measures are the establishment of new ecologically valuable habitats on roof spaces by using vegetation that is characteristic of the Oslo fjord region with its wealth of species. You can also create smaller areas with dead wood and open areas with sand and stone that will become suitable habitats for insects.

The table below shows a general list of measures that may be relevant in a physical development context:
MeasuresSuitable areasStatement
At least 50% of the site's area must have vegetationallIn most cases, green roofs, which are also important for local stormwater management, will help to ensure that the requirement can be fulfilled.
Indigenous species should generally be used. None of the species may be registered on the Alien Species List of Norway 2018 and the species must be ecologically risk assessed.all

Indigenous species support locally valuable habitat.

For example, some butterfly species are linked to a special plant.

Development of multilayered natureallIn nature, plants are often divided into four layers (bottom, field, bush and tree). Multilayered nature contributes to greater biodiversity.
Green roofsRoofs

Green roofs represent significant potential for the development of biodiversity and strengthening ecological contexts.

The preference is often for roofs with varying depth of growth medium, both with a view to the development of biodiversity and ecological contexts, and to accommodate the roof's tolerance (loads).

Apart from sedum, meadow and beach vegetation are regarded as suitable for green roofs.

Example of requirement: at least 30% of the roof must have indigenous meadow or beach vegetation.

Uncovering/restoring streams Uncovering/restoring streams represent a good opportunity for developing rich biodiversity.
Rain gardens, ditches Stormwater measures in the form of rain gardens and ditches enable the growth of indigenous wetland vegetation.
Open sections with sand and small stonesallOpen sections with sand and smaller stones provide habitats for sand-living insects, e.g. bees.
WoodallDead wood, preferably from hardwood, can create good habitats for insects.
Insect hotelallAn insect hotel can create a home for, among other things, solitary bees.
Nesting boxesRoofs, walls and treesSupports birdlife
Bat boxesRoofs, walls and treesCan help to safeguard threatened species

Related links: 

Published: 08. Feb 2018, Last modified: 31. May 2019